Rule 34 Made The Internet Another Final Frontier

Rule 34 Made The Internet Another Final Frontier
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To the few of you which might not know, Rule 34 is one of the most popular and comedically cited Rules of the Internet. It states clearly: There is porn of it, no exceptions. While hundreds of thousands of attempts have been made to prove otherwise, almost no such results have emerged as of yet. And if any do, Rule 35: If no porn is found at the moment, it will be made. With this law of cyber space in place, let us consider two other Rules of the Internet that further help shed light on this subject and why such information is relevant to all of us IRL.

First, Rule 38 states: No real limits of any kind apply here – not even the sky. One of the beauties of the Internet is that nearly anything can be created, shared, or discovered at any point in time. The entirety of all human knowledge within our very finger tips. A place where works can be measured for what they are, not for who they were created by. Combine these capabilities with human sexual creativity and crude, unchecked horniness, and weird works are bound to spring forth.

Rule 34 is quite literally a reverberating reflection of Murphy’s law: Anything that can go wrong will go wrong. Or, in this case, anything that can be turned into porn, will be turned into porn. This ties into the next Rule which feels quite drastically overlooked by 4chan, reddit, and Anonymous members alike.

Rule 43: The more beautiful and pure a thing is – the more satisfying it is to corrupt it.

Consider the hugely controversial art piece, the Piss Christ, by Andres Serrano.

Piss Christ

If you’ve never heard of the work before, Serrano collected a container of his own urine, then proceeded by placing a crucifix into the container and then photographing the amber coated Christ. At the time, it was unthinkable for such a shocking (and for many outright disturbing) piece of work to receive such praise and attention. It still receives strong reactions to this day from just as many. Fast forward nearly 50 years, and people constantly get into pissing contest as to who can make the most unimaginable jokes, the naughtiest pornography, or the most memes about a politician.

While freedom is a beautiful thing, total anonymity requires no conscience or responsibility. And simply because we have the means and capabilities to publish and distribute any aspect of work within the Internet does not mean that we always should.
(This article included.)

It is far to easy to become beyond overwhelmed in regards to the current state of realities. In a world where anything can become porn, there are no limits to our creative responsibilities, and the more beautiful and pure an object or creation is the more satisfaction people take in degrading such a thing, what rules or boundaries are we even truly left with?

While Rules 34, 38 and 43 might be seen as freeing and satirical from that of a real world-to-Internet point of view, the more our lives revolve around this electric universe the greater relevancy it gains for us. Especially with the emergence of virtual and augmented reality, one should tread lightly around the potential of living a fake existence filled with metaphorical hate graffiti, limitless capabilities, and seemingly never ending 4 dimensional orgies which numb the brain and fool the body.

The further down we dig claiming we’ve almost reached the treasure of fulfillment and completeness, the harder it is to get out of the graves we’ve dug for ourselves.

So Welcome to The Internet: To Boldly Go Where No Meta Has Gone Before.

To view the full list of Internet Rules and discover what you’ve been doing wrong on the web this whole time, check them out at:
https://archive.org/stream/RulesOfTheInternet/RulesOfTheInternet..txt

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Scott Corvus
Written by
Scotty is a 22-year-old writer, director, night owl, minimalist, futurist, and hot sauce enthusiast. He believes Heroes are good, but that Villains can be great. You can also visit his website here.

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